Courses

Several research projects are underway at ARSL, but ARSL is not only dedicated for scientific research, it also serves as the primary conduit for education. Students get hand-on experience with nuclear detectors, Moto Carlo simulations, and radioisotopes at this teaching laboratory. Currently, several advanced courses in nuclear sciences are taught directly via the facilities at ARSL.

  • Introduction to radiochemistry (C 204)

Required textbook: “Nuclear and Radiochemistry, Fundamentals and Applications” by Karl Heinrich Lieser, Wiley-VCH.

 Course outcome:
1. Obtain a general idea about the contribution of nuclear science to the civilization and its impact to humanity.
2. Understand the basic properties of radioisotopes.
3. Understand the mass and energy involved in spontaneous nuclear decay.
4. Understand the radiation effects on matter, the radiation biology and radiation protection.
5. Comprehend the principles and techniques of radioanalysis. Understand its applications in general chemistry, environmental and life sciences.
6. Understand the basic statistics in nuclear counting measurement.
7. Recognize the major techniques in nuclear detection and measurment.
8. Obtain a general idea on the wide applications of radiochemistry in a variety of scientific disciplines such as medical science, national security, nuclear energy, environmental science, etc.

  • Radioisotope Laboratory (P 313)

Required textbook: Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection, by James E. Turner, Wiley-VCH

Course Description:
A one-semester course for science majors (Physics and Nuclear Engineering). A course designed to provide a working knowledge of radioisotopes and their technical uses with emphasis on radiation safety, the use of nuclear instrumentation, and tracer problems. The following is an outline of the major concepts to be covered in this course:
I. Mechanics, Electricity, Energy Transfer, and Quantum Theory
II. Atomic and Nuclear Structure
III. Radioactivity
IV. Interaction of Radiation with matter
V. Radiation Dosimetry
VI. Biological Effects of Radiation
VII. Radiation Safety Guides

  • Nuclear Engineering & Radiochemistry Instrumentatoin (C 314)

Required textbook: Radiation Detection and Measurement by Glenn F. Knoll, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Course outcome:
1. Obtain a general idea about the contribution of nuclear science to the civilization and its impact to humanity.
2. Understand the basic properties of radioisotopes.
3. Understand the mass and energy involved in spontaneous nuclear decay.
4. Understand the radiation effects on matter, the radiation biology and radiation protection.
5. Comprehend the principles and techniques of radioanalysis. Understand its applications in general chemistry, environmental and life sciences.
6. Understand the basic statistics in nuclear counting measurement.
7. Recognize the major techniques in nuclear detection and measurement.
8. Obtain a general idea on the wide applications of radiochemistry in a variety of scientific disciplines such as medical science, national security, nuclear energy, environmental science, etc.

  • Research in Nuclear and Radiochemistry (C 412)

Required textbook: none.

Course description:
The course will consist of lectures on the advance topics of nuclear science, radiochemistry, and their applications in related fields. Laboratory work will introduce you to state-of-the-art instrumentation and technology used routinely in applied nuclear science. In addition to the formal instruction, the course will include a guest lecture series and tours of nearby research centers at universities and national laboratories. Students will meet and interact with prominent research scientists from universities and the DOE national labs who are working in nuclear and radiochemistry, nuclear medicine, nuclear forensics, and related fields.

 

 

 

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